Adopted. Raised as white. No identity.

Anonymous
Kennewick, WA

Being Latina, with a white name, but in knowledge of my Latino surname. I try to be supportive of my friends with their biracial and transracial adoptions, but it is so hard. I have suffered and struggled so much with my identity. People have such good intentions, but the children suffer. Then, “Be glad you were adopted”, attempting to make me feel guilty. YOU ALL HAVE NO IDEA what it is like .

Keep the conversation going - comment and discus with your thoughts

  • GoHoosiers

    I appreciate you speaking out about this. I have two daughters, both adopted & both Asian. It is helpful to me to hear the thoughts & feelings of older adoptees, as a reminder that no matter how well-off my children are today, they may not always feel “happy” or “fortunate” that they are adopted, regardless of how difficult lives may have been had they remained in the country of their birth. As their adoptive parents we can love them and provide for them, but we can never really understand the complexities that their trans-racial adoptions bring to their lives, as much as we want to. We can try to educate ourselves though, and we can listen, so thank you for giving me that opportunity.

  • mischling3rd

    So would you agree that all mixed-race kids who “look white” should be reared by white parents? No more of these “passing for white” accusations (The people accused are “passing” for what they really are anyway)? If color and phenotype are everything, at least be consistent!

 

Tweets by Michele Norris