I bet they’re good at math.

Steve Titterton
Lindenwold, NJ

I’m white, and the father of two Asian children. Went into that thinking that race was irrelevant if I thought so, the social workers told me that I was wrong, and they were right. My card is about how I was made aware of what it means to make assumptions about people by looking at them, which I didn’t understand until people said things like this to me.

Keep the conversation going - comment and discuss with your thoughts

  • Guest

    What other assumptions did you become aware of?

  • Ronnygweilo

    I’m white, and my wife and stepson are Chinese. All three of us have fun with racist/stereotype jokes because they’re: #1 – Funny (it’s true – admit it), #2 – They usually open a family discussion on why a particular joke is humorous to either me, my wife, or son if any one of us doesn’t think it’s funny, and especially #3 – it’s only a joke. And, by the way, our son sucks at math. He’s an incredible guitarist, though. Chinky Hendrix – racist joke! :)

    • jwa49038

       Love your family’s sense of humor, Ronny.  Laughing at our preconceptions and stereotypes is a much better solution than hating.  I had a college class with one black guy in a class of whites.  Several of us kept asking him to tell white jokes.  I’m honest enough with myself to admit that the rest of my race and I deserve to be laughed at from time to time.  It would not only have been entertaining, but an interesting look at ourselves from a different point of view.

    • Steve

      Ronny: My daughters actually ARE good at math, but the first time I heard a comment about intelligence, I was carrying my older daughter as she babbled and drooled on me! (Not showing any signs of math aptitude at 1 year old). Felt like people had a lot of nerve making an assumption about my kid just from looking at her, which I think is a good definition of racism. Sometimes racism can appear in the form of a compliment. 

 

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