I am mom, not the babysitter

The-FamilyMikaela Rejbrand,
San Francisco, CA.

Being a person of mixed race, my biological mom is white and my biological father is black, and having married an Irish man, my children are much lighter skinned than I am and therefore am often mistaken for “the babysitter”. The constant theme since my children have been born is that, “Oh wow, your kids look so much like their dad!”. I never understood that comment as I see myself in my children and beyond the color of their skin. With my children so young, my son is 2 and my daughter is 4, I have not yet broached the very complicated questions around race and the history of how people of all colors have had to endure discrimination, slavery, persecution, and hate. My children do not see color, they see people, and I hope that when the day comes that I will begin sharing stories of my ancestors, that the color of one’s skin will be just that, the color of your skin.

 

I am mom, not the babysitter

The-FamilyMikaela Rejbrand,
San Francisco, CA.

Being a person of mixed race, my biological mom is white and my biological father is black, and having married an Irish man, my children are much lighter skinned than I am and therefore am often mistaken for “the babysitter”. The constant theme since my children have been born is that, “Oh wow, your kids look so much like their dad!”. I never understood that comment as I see myself in my children and beyond the color of their skin. With my children so young, my son is 2 and my daughter is 4, I have not yet broached the very complicated questions around race and the history of how people of all colors have had to endure discrimination, slavery, persecution, and hate. My children do not see color, they see people, and I hope that when the day comes that I will begin sharing stories of my ancestors, that the color of one’s skin will be just that, the color of your skin.

I am mom, not the babysitter

The-FamilyMikaela Rejbrand,
San Francisco, CA.

Being a person of mixed race, my biological mom is white and my biological father is black, and having married an Irish man, my children are much lighter skinned than I am and therefore am often mistaken for “the babysitter”. The constant theme since my children have been born is that, “Oh wow, your kids look so much like their dad!”. I never understood that comment as I see myself in my children and beyond the color of their skin. With my children so young, my son is 2 and my daughter is 4, I have not yet broached the very complicated questions around race and the history of how people of all colors have had to endure discrimination, slavery, persecution, and hate. My children do not see color, they see people, and I hope that when the day comes that I will begin sharing stories of my ancestors, that the color of one’s skin will be just that, the color of your skin.

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