No, but where are FROM from?

image17Tina,
Birmingham. AL.

Nevermind the fact that I speak with a southern accent, that my attire is noticeably of American influence, or that my last name is German. When someone asks where I’m from and I give them the name of my hometown, this answer is somehow unacceptable, so I give them the name of my birthplace – Hampton, Virginia.

Being half-Caucasian and American born automatically makes me foreign in the eyes of many and I’m often met with remarks like, “Are you an immigrant?”, “Do you eat kimchi?”, and “in your country…”

Race is defined by culture, people, not the color of of ones skin.

 

No, but where are FROM from?

image17Tina,
Birmingham. AL.

Nevermind the fact that I speak with a southern accent, that my attire is noticeably of American influence, or that my last name is German. When someone asks where I’m from and I give them the name of my hometown, this answer is somehow unacceptable, so I give them the name of my birthplace – Hampton, Virginia.

Being half-Caucasian and American born automatically makes me foreign in the eyes of many and I’m often met with remarks like, “Are you an immigrant?”, “Do you eat kimchi?”, and “in your country…”

Race is defined by culture, people, not the color of of ones skin.

No, but where are FROM from?

image17Tina,
Birmingham. AL.

Nevermind the fact that I speak with a southern accent, that my attire is noticeably of American influence, or that my last name is German. When someone asks where I’m from and I give them the name of my hometown, this answer is somehow unacceptable, so I give them the name of my birthplace – Hampton, Virginia.

Being half-Caucasian and American born automatically makes me foreign in the eyes of many and I’m often met with remarks like, “Are you an immigrant?”, “Do you eat kimchi?”, and “in your country…”

Race is defined by culture, people, not the color of of ones skin.

Tweets by Michele Norris