Carol Salami-Goswick
Eugene, OR

I’m a white woman who was born, raised, and lived in CA until I was 54. I was in college during the 60′s and was sympathetic to the black folks struggling for equality in the South. In my 30′s I had a serious relationship with a black man. I worked in an ethnically diverse social services environment and thought I was pretty much a non-racist until I moved to Macon, GA where the population is almost 50-50 white-black. The experience was jarring and I was compelled to question my perceptions of myself as being prejudice free as I struggled to comprehend the deep racial bitterness and divide and its impact on my new community. I am happy to report that during the 11 years that I lived there, the community had started a conversation on race issues and that I had a chance to work closely and develop friendships with black people in the community before I moved to Oregon.

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  • Karen

    Thanks for your honesty. I’m a born-and-raised white Southern girl who always heard people from outside the South say how “racist” the South was…but I grew up in integrated public schools and it was perfectly natural to me to have friends who were black. Now I live in an area of the South where there are lots of “transplants” from the Northeast, and I’ve heard much more racism coming from them than I ever hear from Southern whites. It seems that they came from white enclaves and so to them, other races are an “unknown” to be feared. I’m thankful yo have grown up in the so-called “racist” South.

  • Karen

    Thanks for your honesty. I’m a born-and-raised white Southern girl who always heard people from outside the South say how “racist” the South was…but I grew up in integrated public schools and it was perfectly natural to me to have friends who were black. Now I live in an area of the South where there are lots of “transplants” from the Northeast, and I’ve heard much more racism coming from them than I ever hear from Southern whites. It seems that they came from white enclaves and so to them, other races are an “unknown” to be feared. I’m thankful yo have grown up in the so-called “racist” South.