Why isn’t my Quincenera proof enough?

Emily Angelica Roldan, Saint Francisville, LA. My father is from Colombia and my mother is from Georgia. I have pale freckled skin, glasses, and I am a natural blonde with bottle red hair. I did not grow up speaking Spanish (my siblings and I the only cousins who do not speak it). When I was […]

My relationship is not a stereotype.

Lauren Smith, New Orleans, LA. Just because I am white and my (soon to be husband) is black does not mean that our relationship is a stereotype or a fetish, nor is it to blame for whatever you may want to blame it on. Our relationship is strong, beautiful, and full of love for each […]

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We All Bleed the Same Color!

Curtis Bleaux, New Orleans, LA. People value nationalities, the privilege & the poverty struck. But we should value the Respect Value giving everyday by our peers, coworkers and society we live in… All our bones are white with red blood when exposed… Stop degrading one another based on pigmentation it’s only skin. We are Humans […]


I’m An Individual NOT A Color!

Nadra Enzi, New Orleans, LA. Anyone with eyes can see that I’m a dark Black man. That and a couple dollars might buy you a cup of coffee at a trendy shop. Two terms of Obama-inflamed identity politics makes me reassert a lifelong commitment to individualism. I’m not a one-size-fits-all person. The fact I voted […]

Separation based on race – horrifying.

Joycelyn Cole Terrytown, LA As a high school sophomore in 1955, I attended our school system’s Oratorical Contest. The finalists were a white girl from my high school and a black boy from St.Augustine H.S. We attended the contest in a high school auditorium. The black boy won. He walked out with a huge trophy. […]


Thaddeus, Nashville, TN. I was raised poor in Louisiana where the generations of my family before me farmed and picked cotton, fished and lived off the land. Our water was rain water caught in a ground cistern and we used an outhouse for a toilet and boiled water for each night to bathe. So please […]

“Daddy must’ve gotten that for you”

Megan, Keithville, LA. I am a white female and I do have nice things. People always assume that my dad gets me everything. Little do they know, I’ve had a job since I was 15 to be able to buy myself nice things. I pay for my gas, I pay for anything extra I want, […]

I’m just American, not African American.

Lottie MSF, St. Louis, MO. Born in LA, raised in Compton, became an adult in Bay Area, relocated to MO. Loved by entrepreneur/homemaker grandparents. Raised by entrepreneur, GED, get the job done, courageous, make it happen parents with 50+ years of marriage. I’m a well balanced contributing, career woman, parent, wife, aunt & daughter. My […]


A Cajun Girl in her Kilt

Michelle Blanchard Ardillo, Rockville, MD. A Cajun girl in her kilt, that’s me. My dad was born and raised in southeast Louisiana, as was I, but my mother was born to Scottish immigrants who came to the US for economic and religious freedom. Upon marrying my father, however, she abandoned her Scottish heritage and adopted […]

Tattoos and piercings don’t equal trashy.

Megan, Keithville, LA. People always call me and my family trashy because we have tattoos and I have piercings as well. People should be able to express themselves in whatever way they want to, whether it be by tattoos and piercings or anything other. Be you


My hair defines me, woman Black!

Meteorologist Rhonda Lee, Shreveport, LA. I was let go from my job as a meteorologists at KTBS in Shreveport, LA for a Facebook post where I defended my hair, and later Black kids. I’m pregnant now and feel there is still so much I need to do to change the world before my son gets […]


Black. Good hair? Indian in your family?

Nicole, New Orleans, LA. Black women are so obsessed with their hair that it can totally consume their life… “I can’t get in the pool ‘cuz I can’t get my hair wet”. “Girl, I can’t work out and sweat and mess up my hair”. “I can’t buy that. I gotta pay to get my hair […]

A member of the fogotten race

Anna Fraley, Jena, LA. Do people realize that Native Americans still exist? WHY are our struggles for equality not brought to thr forefront like those of the African Americans, Muslim Americans, and Latinos? We are the forgotten.

Teach in Japan, but you’re black

Dee Moore, Shreveport, LA. Hajimemashite! That is the stigma I am always facing in my community. I am a 25 year old African American educator who has plans to teach overseas in Japan. I am also studying Japanese so that I can develop some kind of fluency. Since I was young, I was always interested […]

What can one white woman do?

Maggy Wolf, New Orleans, LA. Other than voting my liberal conscience and trying to be extra kind and generous to black people I meet in my daily life, I feel helpless to make any significant difference. How can one person help the poor, the disenfranchised, the under-educated escape from the cycle of poverty?

“I wish I had my n*****-shooter”

Julian Riggs Smith Durham, NH Growing up in a little town in Louisiana during the Second Word War, I found nothing strange about the fact that my white grandparents often ate breakfast and lunch at the kitchen table kitchen with ‘Stell, their black cook, and John, her husband–and that John and ‘Stell never ate with […]

We are miseducated and don’t know.

Christopher Bland New Orleans, LA Recently I’ve been studying my history, my essence, that extends beyond what was taught in school and at church. I remember learning more about my race’s detriment and disabilities over our triumphs and royalty. From Kemet up until now, we possess more powerful stories than we know about and every […]

Black family history hard to uncover

Chadwick Campbell Berkeley, CA Being black and from Louisiana, searching for my family past my great grandparents is very difficult. Finding people who were, literally, not legal citizens of this country is a very difficult endeavor.

Saudi born, ethnically Indian, I’m American.

Akul Nishawala New Orleans, LA This is usually the narrative of the story that answers the question, “Where are you from?” When I say I was born in Saudi Arabia, my brown skin leads people to say, “So, you’re Saudi?” No, my parents are from India. “Oh, so you’re from India.” No, I’ve never lived […]

What will my children look like?

Madeline Murphy New Orleans, LA My father is white. My mother is black. My experiences and perspective as someone who is visibly “mixed” is something I greatly want for my own children – and can’t help but worry about. What if my children look white and people identify them as such? What if they look […]

Yes Black people are racist too

Elizabeth Ragad, Covington, LA. I’m so tired of Black people pulling the race card when things aren’t going there way. And YES there are racist Black people too! It’s NOT just a “White Thing”. White people do not hold a monopoly on racism. All races have good, bad, rich, poor, kind, cruel, loving, hateful, selfless […]

All the Mexicans here are Black.

Jessica Laursen San Diego, CA to New Orleans, LA When moving from San Diego to New Orleans as a teenager I realized the jobs held predominantly by Mexican-Americans in Southern California were performed by African-Americans in the south. Jobs such as janitor, yard maintenance, cook. I began to realize how incredibly complex social “status” is. […]

You must check only one race.

Maureen Shuh New Orleans, LA In New Orleans, my children are told by teachers to check one box for race since there is no multi-racial box to check on school and standardized school forms. The teacher will tell my sons what to check based on which race s/he feels is closest to our sons’ appearance. […]

“White” doesn’t define me. I’m Cajun.

Charlene Leger LA I grew up on the outskirts of a city that is almost 70% African American, on a family farm that was right next to the farm of a black family. All of us kids, in both families, grew up thinking that we were one family. I was devastated when my elementary school […]

Leave now! Hanging about to happen.

Bobbie Clark Baton Rouge, LA My father taught school in rural parishes all of his teaching career from the 40’s thru the 70’s. I recall one afternoon he arrived home, and he and my mother went into the bedroom. I sat by their door to hear what was going on and heard my father crying. […]

You didn’t grow up in LA

Eileen Spillman Wilsonville, OR That was the line my husband threw at me whenever we argued about his burgeoning racism. I had grown up in a small lily-white town in Oregon where, he told me, it is easy to love all the races because they aren’t your next-door-neighbors. I hadn’t lived through the LA riots […]

Where are your parents from? Earth.

Alice L. Costa Mesa, CA I always get asked “Where are you from”. Answer: LA. Where are your parents from?: Earth. Why is it that when people see a non-white person, they have to be identified by their race/ethnicity/heritage? Do people ever ask a white man where his parents are from? What their heritage is? […]

“First BLACK President” – racist identifier.

Scotty Martone Port Vincent, LA It’s hypocritical for those who claim we are now in a post-racial society, yet continue to use the term “First Black President”. As we all know, President Obama was born into an interracial marriage. Therefore, an all to reasonable argument could be made that he is just another WHITE president. […]

Black babies cost less to adopt

Michelle P. Covington, LA We decided to adopt a child years ago. We are not infertile, but felt like it was a great way to add to our family, while loving someone who needed us. Our research showed us that African-American children, especially boys, are the least adoptable in our country. We decided to adopt […]

How do you treat your family?

Gina LA I am starting to reject the ideas of “Us” and “Them” at all levels, although I never thought I’d feel that way. It’s a journey. When I say “How do you treat your family?” it’s an acknowledgement that we are all genetically related. If you accept that idea, it’s only natural to ask […]