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“You can pass.” Lifetime identity struggle.

Erica Jameson, Ashland, OR. My parents adopted five muti-racial children, something unheard of in the rural mountain town we lived in. Between being confused about being different, to occasional thoughtless racism, the line “You can pass [for white]” still makes me uneasy. Does this mean that I should want to? I still don’t know.

Q: Where are YOU from? A: Here.

Lorena San Diego, CA I’m multiracial and live in a very ethnically diverse city, but I was still asked this question SO. MANY. TIMES. growing up. I never realized how ignorant and rude of a question it was until I became an adult. I can only hope no one asks my son this question. Because, […]

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More than “just a Black girl”

Jolie Anne Chevalier, San Jose, CA. This is me at eight years old back in 1979, the daughter of an African-American/Seminole Indian mother, and a Irish-French-American father. Growing up, I was faced with contradictions in a world of opposites; although I was multiracial my mother told me I was Black, and to identify as such […]

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Finally, a multi-racial option on applications.

James Duvall OUTSIDE USA For the longest time, I’ve always tried to put both my Latin side and my African American side towards the end of job applications. Sometimes they would make you choose one or the other. so when that happens I would alternate between Latino and Black. But now I can finally pick […]

My children are people not flavors.

Dionne Bensonsmith Pomona, CA Mother of 4 transnational, multiethnic and multiracial children. My husband is Russian with two children from his previous relationship, I am African American with one child from my previous relationship and we have a child together. Our children are not mocha, java, vanilla or chocolate swirl…they are Russian, African American, So. […]

You must check only one race.

Maureen Shuh New Orleans, LA In New Orleans, my children are told by teachers to check one box for race since there is no multi-racial box to check on school and standardized school forms. The teacher will tell my sons what to check based on which race s/he feels is closest to our sons’ appearance. […]

Multi-racial man without a country to call home.

Juan Carlos Greater Boston, MA If you look at me… I look Latino. Not tall, dark features – hair, eyes, skin, wide nose, full lips. If you ask me, my ancestry is African, Incan, Iberian, and Jewish. Those are the ones I know of. I grew up in New England, attending a catholic school in […]

Half Jewish. Half WASP. All tribal.

Andrea Jill Berman Rochester, NY Grew up working class Jewish in buffalo NY. a very ethnic city. No melting pot there. people kept their ethnic identities. I was always welcome in my friends homes. my brother’s best friend in the 1970s was black. Very unusual. my parents did anti defamation and voting rights activism, so […]

He must look like his dad.

  Rhonda Kaplan Hyde Park, MA I’m sorry for submitting another race card, but I figured out how to make the same statement more elegant in six words. We are a multiracial family–I am white and my husband is black and Asian. When my son was a baby, (white) people would often make this comment […]

White couple adopts four brown Brazilians.

James F. New Haven, CT A few years ago we adopted four beautiful children from Brazil. Their skin is darker than ours. We also have a biological child who, obviously, looks a little more like us. We love our little multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual family. It’s a beautiful thing!