1472226_10152390488118776_1855377291_n

Yellow outside, white inside, adopted Twinkie.

Karen Skillin Rojas San Francisco, CA Adopted from Korea at 4 1/2 months old, I was raised in an entirely Caucasian family and community until I went to college. I often struggle with not identifying with my Asian exterior (yellow), which is how the world around me sees me. I find I identify so much [...]

I became an activist and prisoner

Dan Kelly San Francisco, CA I was in a Brooklyn HS in the early 60s and the images coming from the south inspired me to question the social conventions that supported segregation, From that it was a short jump to questioning forteign policies that justified invading 3rd world countries. College seemed irrelevant and I left [...]

Black grandma, White grandpa. That’s weird!

Val’Dionna P. San Francisco, CA Throughout the years it has been a bit difficult to understand the many emotions and stereotypes being of color and mixed. It is important to understand that how one is raised growing up in a complex world that continues to critique someone on the features or melancholy of their skin [...]

But you speak English so well!

Lisa Lee San Francisco, CA Asian Americans are constantly reminded that they don’t “belong” in America, despite their contributions of building up this great nation. We are reminded in ways big and small, such as the seemingly harmless remark of “but you speak English so well!” The Civil Rights Movement paved the way for all [...]

Mullet. Dashiki. Mom White. Step-dad Black.

Paco Romane San Francisco, CA I grew up in an all white racist small town, with a hispanic nickname (paco), a white mom, and a black step-dad who’s last name was White. It taught me a lot including I believe there are two different kinds of white people: those become “black” around black people and [...]

Uncovering lost migration stories, increasing empathy

Sarah Lee San Francisco, CA My family’s migration stories trace back only two generations, but as a second generation Chinese American, I am often unaware of the struggles and hardships my grandparents went through before living in North America. What I have found most interesting as I’ve uncovered some of these migration stories is that, [...]

Home. The Projects. White and confused.

Dolores Zacconi San Francisco, CA Growing up in the projects as one of the ” 5% white”, had a profound impact on my life; sometimes I was accepted, sometimes I wasn’t. I never felt like I “belonged”; I didn’t play in the playground on the projects’ grounds; I didn’t hang out in the corridors or [...]

Learning I was a white girl

Rachel Robbins San Francisco, CA When I was child, we didn’t really have the commonly held words and concepts regarding the identities of biracial people the way we now do. So I was understandably a bit confused by my biracial family. My mom and aunties are biracial, and my own father was out of the [...]

Found my ancestors and grief too.

R.Henry Goins San Francisco, CA I am a genealogist. I have been researching my North Carolina family for about ten years now. I found my great grandfather’s family in some notes held at the North Carolina Archives. The family lived in Belews Creek and Sauratown. Sauratown sounds like sorrow. I found a ledger with the [...]

Inescapable mulatto nature of American culture

Submitted via Twitter: @zerode San Francisco, CA A quote from jazz critic Albert Murray. More about Albert Murray: Taken from http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/murray-albert-1916 Albert Murray, an African American novelist, jazz critic, professor, and essayist, was born in Nokomis, Alabama on May 12, 1916. His birth parents were Sudie Graham and John Young but he was adopted by [...]

White, female – begin to speak – IMMIGRANT!

Åsa Nojd San Francisco, CA For better or worse, my accent changes others’ perception of me in an instant when they hear me speak. That used to make me feel very self-conscious and I sometimes avoided talking, not to reveal that I’m actually a foreigner and not just another white American. It took me a [...]

A turban doesn’t mean a terrorist

Sarabjit Baveja San Francisco, CA Over two hundred thousand innocent Sikhs in this country are being routinely hated, victimized, profiled and discriminated against because they wear turbans as part of religious attire. Little Sikh children are being severely bullied in schools. Please help stop this madness, please stand up for your Sikh neighbors and friends.