Asma Mohammed
Westminster, CA

Arabian American. Born and raised in America. Never broken the law. Never punched anyone. Never stolen anything. Name one thing that makes me a terrorist.

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  • Amal Kay Khan

    Asalamu Alaikum Sister. 
    Please know not all Americans think badly of Muslims.  I am American and a convert.  You never know if one of the Americans you meet is stareing at you, not because they hate you, but because they are curious.  It may be that that curiosity will result in them taking the time to study Islam.  Thats how I found Islam.  The family that caused me to get curious about Islam never even knew I converted until after I had been Muslim for many years and sent them a package apon returning from Hajj.  Know we are not all bad.  I am not denying racism and prejudice, I have faced too much to do that.   But I just wanted you to know there may be silver lining,  That not all the stares are bad.

  • Benny Falcon

    I am white, 52, and christian. Persionally I would not suspect radical terrorist.  I do not understand all the details in your beleifs and can only admit to beleiving what is being told to me on TALK Radio !  I choose to beleive that not all Muslims hate the Jews and vice versa. I pray to God that we learn to accept each others right to worship freely.  Regardless, we are created by the same God and we must fight anything that opposses our rights to freedom.

  • xdiemaker

    Your race would never make me your enemy…your actions might in a second.

  • Wolfbaby

    Asma, some of us know the difference between a Muslim and an extremist. We know that just because you’re of Arabic descent or worship Allah, that does NOT automatically make you a terrorist. At the same time, I think some people tend to stereotype because there’s really no way to tell, except by actions, whether someone of Arabic descent is Muslim or Islamic Extremist. That’s what has us scared, because by the time the actions tell the tale, the damage has been done. Do you have any advice or suggestions that might help us to recognize a peaceful Muslim rather than an extremist who hates us just because we aren’t one of his group? And for the record, I’m sorry for what you’ve suffered by association. It’s not fair, and I hope we can find a way to move past it.

    • American_Race

      Unfortunately, the violent actions of the extremists speak louder than the peaceful silence of the pacifists.  If peaceful Islam wants me to hear its voice, it needs to speak above a whisper.

      • Wolfbaby

         I agree completely. Believe me, in spite of what I said, I have to admit I’m guilty of racial profiling when it comes to this issue. How can any American not be, after 9/11? I was just trying to make a point

        • American_Race

          We certainly agree about this issue, and, by your definition, I’m guilty as well.

          However,, I’m also frustrated that the voices of a peaceful Islam are slow to denounce the violent actions of its fanatics.  Unfortunately, my perception, America’s perception, the world’s perception of Islam are largely shaped by the sounds of car bombs.  I make no apology for my perception when bomb blasts constantly ring in my ear.

  • Sassyclassy55

    True that

  • Bowlesm

    There will always be enough ignorance to go around. I will never forget an incident right after 9-11 where a “Christian” shot a Hindu clerk in the face to avenge the “Muslem” attack on America.  Just think about this for a little bit…. how diverse!