Once had dreadlocks. Now know better.

Susan Tsoglin
Seattle, WA

At the time, I was a white female college student in a mainly white university. Following the disaster that was the reaction to NineEleven, I became more political. I became involved in protests and rallies, doing educational flash mobs, being “alternative.” I was surrounded by white hippie culture, which had re-appropriated dreadlocks from other ethnic groups cause it looked cool. So, to follow suit, I had my hair locked (which wasn’t easy, let me tell ya). It was only after I took a class on whiteness, privilege, and isms, that I understood why dreadlocks did not belong on my white head.

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The History of Dreadlocks


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