No thanks; I am with him.

Yuko Taniguchi,
Rochester, MN

When I am in a line with my white husband at the grocery store, hotel check-in, or flight check-in, etc, I am approached by a staff with “Can I help you?” “No thanks, I’m with him,” I say. My husband also gets approached when I go through the line first. He says “No thanks, I’m with her.” It reveals how people unconsciously hold the image of a married couple in Minnesota. We are constantly reminded that people don’t notice that we are together.

 

No thanks; I am with him.

Yuko Taniguchi,
Rochester, MN

When I am in a line with my white husband at the grocery store, hotel check-in, or flight check-in, etc, I am approached by a staff with “Can I help you?” “No thanks, I’m with him,” I say. My husband also gets approached when I go through the line first. He says “No thanks, I’m with her.” It reveals how people unconsciously hold the image of a married couple in Minnesota. We are constantly reminded that people don’t notice that we are together.

No thanks; I am with him.

Yuko Taniguchi,
Rochester, MN

When I am in a line with my white husband at the grocery store, hotel check-in, or flight check-in, etc, I am approached by a staff with “Can I help you?” “No thanks, I’m with him,” I say. My husband also gets approached when I go through the line first. He says “No thanks, I’m with her.” It reveals how people unconsciously hold the image of a married couple in Minnesota. We are constantly reminded that people don’t notice that we are together.

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